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Sunday, July 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of The American species of Crepis found in the catalog.

The American species of Crepis

E. B. Babcock

The American species of Crepis

their interrelationships and distribution as affected by polyploidy and apomixis

by E. B. Babcock

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Published by Carnegie Institution of Washington in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Crepis.

  • Edition Notes

    Statement[by] E. B. Babcock [and] G. L. Stebbins, Jr.
    Series[Carnegie Institution of Washington. Publication no. 504], Carnegie Institution of Washington publication -- 504.
    ContributionsStebbins, G. Ledyard 1906-
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQK495.C74 B25
    The Physical Object
    Pagination2 p. ℗ ., 199 p.
    Number of Pages199
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14127748M
    LC Control Number39000697

    The Alabama Plant Atlas is a source of data for the distribution of plants within the state as well as taxonomic, conservation, invasive, and wetland information for each species. The website also provides access to a database and images of plants photos and herbarium specimens found at . Crepis tectorum is a. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs). Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

    Crepis mollis (Jacq.) Asch. is a short-lived perennial yellow herb in the Asteraceae and is distributed in temperate Europe ranging from the Ukraine, western Russia, and the Baltic states in the east to Italy, the Pyrenees, Great Britain, and Germany in the west; it is not found outside of Europe (Kilian et al., ; O’Reilly, ).The genus Crepis L. is thought to be insect pollinated and. Nice used book on Oak species of Central America. The pictures of the herbarium specimens are top notch. A good book to extend our knowledge of oaks into the tropics. Detailed information on where each species is found. While published at the end of WWII this is a s: 1.

    Crepis occidentalis grows in many types of habitat. It is a perennial herb growing a grayish woolly branching stem to about 40 centimeters (16 inches) in height from a deep taproot. The woolly, toothed leaves are up to 30 centimeters (12 inches) long at the base of the plant. 1. The primary genetic processes causing evolution in Crepis are gene mutations and structural changes in the chromosomes. 2. The roles of gene mutations are the production of morphological and physiological differentiation within and between species, the accumulation of intra- and interspecific sterility, and possibly the reduction in absolute size of the chromosomes.


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The American species of Crepis by E. B. Babcock Download PDF EPUB FB2

Ecology. Crepis species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including the broad-barred white moth. The fly Tephritis formosa is known to attack the capitula of this plant.

Seeds of Crepis species are an important food source for some bird species. Uses. In Crete, Greece the leaves of Crepis commutata which are called glykosyrida (γλυκοσυρίδα) are Family: Asteraceae.

Get this from a library. The American species of Crepis: their interrelationships and distribution as affected by polyploidy and apomixis.

[E B Babcock; G Ledyard Stebbins]. Crepis intermedia is a North American species of flowering plants in the daisy family known by the common name limestone is native to the Pacific Northwest, Columbia Plateau, Great Plains and Southwestern regions of western North America.

Crepis intermedia grows in many types of open and forested habitat. It is a perennial herb growing an erect, multibranched stem from a thick Family: Asteraceae. The second, published inwas titled The American Species of Crepis: their interrelationships and distribution as affected by The American species of Crepis book and apomixis.

In The American Species of Crepis, Babcock and Stebbins described the concept of the polyploid complex, and its role in plant : Linnean Medal (), Leidy Award (). Crepis occidentalis is a North American species of flowering plant in the daisy family known by the common names western hawksbeard: or largeflower is native to western Canada (British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan) and the western United States (from the Pacific to the western Great Plains).

Crepis occidentalis grows in many types of : Asteraceae. Species & ITIS Catalogue of Life. Published on the internet. Accessed: June Links. International Plant Names Index. Crepis. Published online. Accessed Feb.

19 The Plant List Crepis in The Plant List Version Published on the internet. Accessed: Feb. Crepis. Missouri Botanical Garden.

Crepis capillaris (L.) Wallr. is an accepted name This name is the accepted name of a species in the genus Crepis (family Compositae).

The record derives from TICA (data supplied on ) which reports it as an accepted name (record B4FE08CBCF-DCAF6BF) with original publication details: Erst. Species & ITIS Catalogue of Life. Published on the internet. Accessed: May. International Plant Names Index. Crepis reuteriana.

Published online. Accessed May. 22 The Plant List Crepis reuteriana in The Plant List Version Published on the internet. Accessed: May. Crepis reuteriana. Crepis alpestris in the Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN), U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service.

Accessed on Oct Accessed on. Species & ITIS Catalogue of Life. Published on the internet. Accessed: May International Plant Names Index.

Crepis aspera. Published online. Accessed Feb. 19 The Plant List Crepis aspera in The Plant List Version Published on the internet. Accessed: Feb. Crepis aspera. Missouri.

The Plants Database includes the following 25 species of Crepis. Click below on a thumbnail map or name for species profiles. Native Introduced Native and Introduced. Crepis acuminata tapertip hawksbeard Crepis atribarba slender hawksbeard Crepis bakeri Baker's hawksbeard.

THE CYTOGENETIC RELATIONSHIPS OF FOUR SPECIES OF CREPIS [Jenkins, James A] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. THE CYTOGENETIC RELATIONSHIPS OF FOUR SPECIES OF CREPISAuthor: James A Jenkins.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

datasets have provided data to the NBN Atlas for this genus. Browse the list of datasets and find organisations you can join if you are interested in participating in a survey for species of Crepis L. Crepis nicaeensis is a European species of flowering plant in the daisy family with the common names French hawk's-beard and Turkish hawksbeard.

It is widespread across much of Europe, as well as being sparingly naturalized in scattered locations in the United States and Canada. Crepis nicaeensis is an annual or biennial herb up to cm (44 inches) tall.

One plant can produce as many as. Crepis biennis in the Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN), U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service. Accessed on Oct Accessed on Oct Vernacular names [ edit ]. Crepis, intra-specific differentiation leads eventually to the origin of new species, given some kind of isolation.

The author rejects, for Crepis, 'the classification of sexual, homoploid populations as species or subspecies primarily, or crucially on the basis of the degree of intersterility or inter-fertility demonstrated by experimental. Crepis f A taxonomic genus within the family Asteraceae – hawksbeard.

A taxonomic genus within the family Calloporidae – little-known bryozoans, of recently revised placement. Statistics. The Plant List includes scientific plant names of species rank for the genus these are accepted species names. The Plant List includes a further scientific plant names of infraspecific rank for the genus do not intend The Plant List to be complete for names of infraspecific rank.

These are primarily included because names of species rank are synonyms. The Atlas of Florida Plants provides a source of information for the distribution of plants within the state and taxonomic information. The website also provides access to a database and images of herbarium specimens found at the University of South Florida and other herbaria.

Crepis m: Psilochenia runcinata.(Fiddle-leaf Hawksbeard)Asteraceae (Sunflower Family) Montane, sub-alpine. Wet meadows. Summer. Lone Mesa State Park, August 5, A very fresh flower stands next to a flower that has been fertilized and has dropped all of its white fluff is the pappus hairs that sit atop the seeds and carry them on the wind after the seed head fully.Crepis L.

Crepis is a genus of ca. species, mostly native to the northern hemisphere (with few additional species in South America and South Africa) (Mabberley ). Its generic limits have long been somewhat obscure and several segregates have been recognized in the past (viz.

Barkhausia Moench and Lagoseris Bieb). However, all are better included in a broadly circumscribed genus Crepis.Crepis runcinata (E. James) Torr. & A. Gray: Canada (North America) United States (North America) Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution.

Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.